A Lil’ Inspiration #28

Accidental Beauty Is The Best!

I'm not sure how many deer are in this photo because they blend in so well with the trees.

Beauty in all its forms can be so breathtaking. Stumbling upon it totally by accident is sublime. There is absolutely no way I could have captured these photos had I planned it.

So this morning as I was walking Mollie, my furkid, I happened upon a huge moving blur. Now because I’m 97% coward and 3% human my initial response was to run. I mean my keen sense of detection picked up that Molliekins and I were in imminent danger and the only way to save our skins was to get the heck outta dodge.

Collage of two images of several deer with a couple looking directly at the camera. Collage of three images of several deer.

Well after I calmed myself a bit my curiosity got the better of me so real stealthy like I hid behind a car, pointed my camera phone in the direction of the beast and shot. One of the problems one encounters when you can’t see and you encounter a stranger in your environment is not knowing what “it” is. My first thought was to magnify but with the sun at my back my screen was black so I just kept shooting. So what a surprise when I come inside and see I caught a gang of deer pretending to be trees. I guess I scared them as much as they scared me.

Images: A group of deer hiding among bare trees.

Happy Friday!!!

Finding Strength In Self-Acceptance

“She’s standing on the corner, cane in hand, waiting to cross, and she looks like she knows where she’s going. She’s approachable and aware. She accepts people the way she has accepted herself, fully. There is a lightness in her footsteps because she doesn’t take herself too seriously. She sees life as an adventure and not an emergency.” ~Joy Thomas, Double Vision Blog

To learn more about Joy’s journey to self-acceptance check out her Woman on the Move article.

Image: Joy Thomas and Roja (her guide dog) are crossing a busy city street.

Guest Post: Lisa Salinger

Reading With Purpose

Originally Published on BlindAlive October 11, 2015, by  Lisa Salinger

I have been an avid reader for most of my life, and when I’m not enjoying a good novel — what some call escapism fiction — I’m reading books about self-improvement. If you were to live with me, day in and day out, you’d think those books weren’t doing me much good. The really unfortunate thing is that, for the most part, you would be right.

I will often be inspired or excited by something I read, and I have the very best of intentions to make it a part of my daily life. Then, I get really busy, or involved in a time-consuming project, or I read another motivational book, and all the fantastic, useful information I’ve read gets shelved, if you’ll excuse the bad pun. What good is it if I spend my time, and sometimes my money, on a book I think is the very epitome of transformational advice if I don’t put it into practice?

I’ve given this some thought lately and wanted to share some things I am beginning to do to get the most from my current reads.

I started by making a list of the memorable books I read but had never implemented. I did not browse through my download history, but just wrote down a few titles I read at some point in the past. Thinking of them made me feel a sense of regret that I had not done more with the material. I came up with three books, which I plan to reread in the near future. To keep this from being an obligation that leaves you feeling flattened, try limiting yourself to five or fewer books.

I resolved to listen to the author. When I come across phrases like “Practice exercise,” “Don’t read on until you’ve done this,” or “Make a list,” I’m actually stopping to do it. I know that if I say I’ll come back to it, or I half-heartedly make a list in my head instead of actually capturing it somewhere, it won’t happen. I’m sure the author did not just build in practice exercises for no good reason. It is likely that these same activities were used by the author to become successful in the areas about which he or she is writing. If I’m investing the time to read the book, I can at least make time to try what the author suggests.

I’m learning to slow down. Sometimes, a book contains so many practical and helpful suggestions, I read it through without stopping. It’s the equivalent of gulping half a gallon of cold water on a hot day. It will do some good, but the real benefit comes from taking it slowly. Now, I try to reserve my reading binges for fiction and take the time to live with a helpful book for a couple of days, or even a couple of weeks so I can really integrate its practices into my daily life.

 

Finally, I’m learning to take notes on what I read. This doesn’t mean I need to write a complete outline of the book, but I should at least jot down anything I find particularly helpful. I am reading more audio books than ever, and while they are great, it is sometimes hard to go back and search for that sought-after bit of information. Taking notes gives me quick access to those parts of a book I value most. What’s more, the act of writing things down helps to cement them in my mind.

Have you ever been so caught up in a plan of action or a premise that you don’t see its faults? Critical thinking has not come naturally to me but is something I have had to cultivate. I find that distilling the premise or plan outlined in a book to just a few thoughts or sentences is like shining a spotlight on it. The flaws are made more visible, and the gems shine like the jewels they truly are.

Do you have a strategy for implementing what you read that I didn’t mention here? If so, please feel free to email support@BlindAlive.com and share it, or post to our Facebook group. Here’s wishing you a happy, transformative reading experience!

F.E.A.R. In Real Time

“I never thought I could “go through that” until going through “that” was the best alternative.” ~Steph

"I never thought I could "go through that" until going through "that" was the best alternative." ~StephWith the exception of a minor situation a couple of years ago, my sight loss has been stable for the last eight years. So when my eye doctor thought my retina might be detaching I was a little apprehensive.

Around the same time I was waiting for my appointment with the retina specialist I was asked by Tosha Michelle to be a featured guest on her blog Everything I Never Told You. The timing was perfect to share one of my favorite posts on FEAR Guest Blog Post by Stephanae McCoy.

I’m pleased to report my retina specialist is recommending I have YAG laser surgery to be done by my ophthalmologist to clear the posterior capsule opacification (PCO) in my right eye. PCO is a common cataract surgery complication where the posterior portion of the capsule becomes hazy. This can happen months or in my case years after cataract surgery. As a matter of fact, I wrote a post called Clarity, Trees & YAG for when I had the surgery done on my left eye in 2015.