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Station in Life, Disabilities & Imagery

Station in life featured image description is in the body of the post.

Station in Life, Disabilities & Imagery

“Inspiration porn is harmful to society and people with disabilities for two main reasons. First, inspiration porn encourages “ableism,” which defines people by their disability and classifies them as inferior to those who are nondisabled. Second, inspiration porn distracts us from looking at the real issues.” ~Joy Thomas

The introduction below is for an article that will help you understand the significance of inspiration porn. To improve humanity by changing the way we perceive one another, let’s begin by understanding everyone desires to belong.

My friend, Joy Thomas, wrote a through-provoking piece “Inspiration or Ableism? How To Tell The Difference.” In the article, she talks about inspiration porn and offers in-depth thoughts on what our reaction to it means. 

As a member of the homo sapiens species, I am in awe, and to some degree saddened, by our differences. In awe, because I can’t comprehend how no one is a carbon copy with over 7 billion people on our planet. Likewise, I’m saddened because it sometimes feels like we place a greater value on which groups from which we come.

Except for my membership within people with disabilities (PwDs), I don’t know what it’s like to belong to any other majority group. Being an African-American female over age 50 with a disability places me in several marginalized categories of humans. I’m saying this to let you know that I have experience in what it’s like to be ‘different’ on many levels. While I won’t be considered acceptable to everyone, I do not and will not consider myself less valuable than another human being.

“Broken Crayons Still Color”

As human beings, we are complex and our world is massive. It makes sense that we would bond to those with shared commonalities. Additionally, it makes sense that our individual biases could prevent us from widening our circle.

When we qualify or compare our station in life to another person from a place of being better it’s problematic. While broken crayons may still color, as humans who are we to determine who’s broken? So please, when you have a moment check out Joy’s article on Crixeo.

Station in Life Featured Image Description:

A close-up view of a single dandelion plant with several seeds floating in the air. The plant is set against a clear blue sky background.

 

 

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Finding Strength In Self-Acceptance

“She’s standing on the corner, cane in hand, waiting to cross, and she looks like she knows where she’s going. She’s approachable and aware. She accepts people the way she has accepted herself, fully. There is a lightness in her footsteps because she doesn’t take herself too seriously. She sees life as an adventure and not an emergency.” ~Joy Thomas, Double Vision Blog

To learn more about Joy’s journey to self-acceptance check out her Woman on the Move article.

Image: Joy Thomas and Roja (her guide dog) are crossing a busy city street.

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The Flourishing Voice Of The Blind Community Impacts Culture

5 Things the Online Community Taught Us About Blindness

Image a bright blue sky with a white cloud and the sun. Poem is at the bottom of the post.
Requiem For A Rainbow ~Rick Fontes

Losing eyesight sucks bigtime! Shame, fear and helplessness threatens our well-being. The word ‘blind’ alone conjures up visions, of living an unfulfilling, lonely life in darkness but those of us experiencing sight loss come to understand this is not entirely true.

While learning to adapt can be challenging we are moving upward, our combined voices are being heard, and we are changing societal presumptions on blindness. The article below celebrates two of those voices. ~Steph

So much has transpired in the last 5 years of blogging together.  Our perspectives have shifted dramatically.  If you look at one of our very first posts, “To Tell or Not to Tell”, about whether to disclose our vision loss in public, to more recent posts about guide dogs and canes, the shift is obvious.  But it didn’t happen overnight.  And it didn’t happen without a lot of input and support from friends we met in the online community. Continue Reading…

REQUIEM FOR A RAINBOW
request from the newly blind
Walk with me awhile.
Be at my side, a steadying hand.
A whispered voice should I stray.
Don’t lift my burden, I must learn its weight.
Merely bide with me awhile
‘Til god compensates my sight.
~Rick Fontes