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Cultivating Resilience Practice 10: Giving Back

Image is described in the body of the post.

HEALTH & WELLNESS

Editor’s Note:

Bold Blind Beauty is thrilled to share with you snippets from Becky Andrews’ new book “Cultivating our Resilience Workbook/Journal.” Adversity strengthens and builds resilience; Becky will share weekly practices to help us become more resilient. ~Steph

Hello All

We are at our final practice in Cultivating Resilience. I hope you have enjoyed this series and found them to be helpful. 

As I mentioned in the introduction, these are the practices that I find helpful in my own life and with my clients as we cultivate resilience. Cultivate is an action word. It means we are continuing to create, to dig down, to pause, to ask for what we need TO CULTIVATE our resilience. Resilience is that time of being stretched, pulled, and transformed as we navigate challenging times in our lives.  

Let’s review the last nine practices:

  • Practice one: Give yourself permission to feel. Honor your feelings and what you need.
  • Practice two: Take care of yourself and offer yourself much self-compassion for the journey.
  • Practice three: Utilize your strengths in the journey. Be authentically you as you navigate the challenging time.
  • Practice four: Reach out for support. Practice healthy boundaries and relationships.
  • Practice five: Resilience takes much grit and determination. Recognize and acknowledge your efforts.
  • Practice six: Find moments to savor, practice gratitude, and be mindful.
  • Practice seven: Find laughter and joy in each day.
  • Practice eight: Open to flexibility.  Perhaps there is another way.
  • Practice nine: Find the meaningful moments and lessons learned along the way.

Today’s Practice 10 Is Giving Back 

Lemonade image is described in the body of the post.
Lemonade

Helping Others. I think of it after we have found that lemonade, how are we going to serve the lemonade to others?  

In Victor Frankl’s book, Man’s Search for Meaning, he teaches that we can discover meaning in three ways: first by creating work or doing deeds to help others, second by experiencing something or encountering someone, and third, by the attitude, we take toward unavoidable suffering.  

Creating work or doing deeds to help others is indeed discovering meaning through our challenges. When we recognize that our difficult time may give us insight to help someone else, it can become empowering. It can become our why. It can become our way of sharing the lemonade that we have gained.  

Through this journey, we have been on what has resonated with you? How can you give back in a meaningful way to help others? Take a pause as much time as you need to ask yourself this question.  

Writing for Bold Blind Beauty gives me pause to think of the impact of Stephanae McCoy on the multiple ways she continues to give back and offer help to others from her challenging times. Such an example of resilience and doing just that.  

Becky and Georgie Image is described in the body of the post.
Hitting Their Stride

 I am not what happened to me. I am what I choose to become.

~Carl Jung

These practices are for you to explore. I honor your unique journey and what is helpful to you as you cultivate resilience. Be yourself. Do what feels best for you. Take it a step at a time in the direction that you want to go. Be kind and gentle to yourself on the journey. Recognize your grit and determination. It truly is awe-inspiring to see the human spirit. Recognize that perhaps, there is another way will help us in our resilience plan. Watch for those meaningful moments and lessons learned along the way. And then, offer lemonade to others.  You can make a difference to someone else’s life.  

If you’d like to join me in our next Cultivate Resilience course – email: resilientsolutionsinc@gmail.com. It will begin the week of September 14th. This is my opportunity to give back and the course is just $35 for 6 sessions. I would love to hear from you and what you have found most helpful about these practices. Also, my cultivate workbook is almost complete. I would love to hear from you on the way you find a workbook to be most accessible. 

About The Author:

Image is described in the body of the post.
Becky Andrews

Becky Andrews is a Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor, Small Business Owner – Resilient Solutions, Inc, and founder of the Daring to Own Your Story ™ Retreats. She is also the author of Look up, move forward – her memoir of Losing her eyesight and finding her vision.  

You can follow her at:

Workbook: 

Cultivating our Resilience Workbook/Journal will be out Fall 2020. Email Becky at becky.lpc@gmail.com to be on the waiting list or preorder.

Image Descriptions:

  • Header: Photo of Becky sitting on an indoor staircase next to her guide dog, Georgie, a gorgeous yellow lab.
  • Lemonade: Photo of a pitcher of lemonade with two full mason glasses sitting on a wicker tray with several loose lemons strewn about. Text on the image says “Cultivating Resilience” and “Becky Andrews, LCMHC.”
  • Hitting Their Stride: Becky appears so joyful as she and Georgie walk a dirt path in the open countryside.
  • Becky is sitting on outdoor steps next to her guide dog, Georgie, a gorgeous yellow lab. 
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CoVid-19 TOTD #6: Being Conscious

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HEALTH & WELLNESS

Editor’s Note:

At Bold Blind Beauty, our goal is for you to enjoy life, but be well while doing it. During #CoVid-19 we want to assist you with that, so here is our  COVID-19 #TOTD (Tip Of The Day).

CoVid-19 TOTD #6: Being Conscious

By Cheryl Minnette

How do you strategically plan your summertime to include
controlling your subconscious?

Summertime is a fun time, or is it? Usually, when Sommertyme comes, there are so many activities to do and places to go. When you’re in the great outdoors, one tends to let go of some of their conscious thinking. For instance, when you go to your favorite park, you slip into your subconscious, because you’re yearning for relaxation and a moment away from the coronavirus. I totally get it, but here’s what ends up happening. 

You get there, hear the ice cream vendors and think to yourself, oh yummm. As you walk further into the park with ice cream cone in hand, you lower your mask to begin enjoying your double scooped sugar cone. Moving along the path, you pass the beautifully arranged fragrant flowerbeds as you head toward the large oval shaped pond. You slowly begin to let your guard down as you feel the warmth of the sun, a breeze kissing your cheek, and still catching the floral fragrance in the air. 

Although our new normal has us more conscious about some things, unfortunately when we switch our mode from ‘fully focused’ to ‘easy-going’, that is usually when our subconscious takes over. This causes us to react before we realize it. 

Here are some reactive examples, now that you are in the park:

  • With your hand, you immediately wipe your mouth as the mess of your quickly melting ice cream cone catches you off guard when it drips from the corner of your mouth.
  • You begin rubbing your nose as the wind tickles it with the scents from the flower beds.
  • You start to touch your eyes as the heat from the sun begins to make them feel dry.
  • You touch your face to brush back hair as a breeze is gently blowing.

Make sure that you avoid touching your mouth, nose, eyes, and face with hands that are unwashed. 

It is not easy living in a conscious state of mind all the time. COVID-19 has propelled you into a new lifestyle. This means you must be consciously mindful of what you are doing at all times when it comes to your safety. 

Your thoughts are welcome, so comment below as to whether this TOTD was helpful, what you would like to know as it relates to safety tips, and what you were able to relate to. Your insights and expressions are appreciated. 

Image Description:

Gloved hands are preparing an icecream cone at a vendor.

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Monthly Beauties | Annastasia Srock

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Meet The Faces of Bold Blind Beautiful & Accomplished Women

Representation Matters! Bold Blind Beauty believes that “Real Beauty Transcends Barriers.” Today’s Cover Model, Annastasia Srock, is a gorgeous college-sophomore who recently started a YouTube channel. Annastasia, who is living with Stargardt disease (a juvenile form of macular degeneration, has such an amazing outlook on life and she sees the beauty in nearly everything. To learn more about Annastasia visit her social media platforms listed below.

Following is personal and empowering insight from Annastasia:

“Losing my sight has brought me more vision than I had ever dreamed. The world around me dimmed, but the light held deep within grew bright and, with that light, I finally see life for everything
it’s meant to be.” 

~Annastasia Srock

My social handles are

Image Description:

Beyond Sight Magazine Cover – Annastasia is laying down with her long wavy golden/brown hair fanned out around her face. She has on a single strand of tiny pearls around her neck and is posed with a pink rose on her right shoulder. With dark red lip color and golden eyes that perfectly match her hair the contrast is striking. The masthead is teal with “Beyond Sight Magazine” in black text. The dot on the ‘i’ in ‘sight’ is the eye used for our 2020 Year of Vision Campaign (described HERE). There are 3 lines of text to the left of Annastasia’s photo that says “Annastasia Srok A Starry-Eyed Life.” In the bottom right corner is a yellow circle with an illustration of Abby looking at a reflection of herself in a standing mirror. She has on a teal dress and a white hat with a black band. In her right hand is her white cane. And of course, she’s sporting her signature explosive hairstyle (peeping from under her hat in the back), and “Monthly Beauties” is yellow text under the circle.

CREDIT:
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Cultivating Resilience Practice 9: Meaningful Moments

Lemonade image is described in the body of the post.

 HEALTH & WELLNESS

Editor’s Note:

Bold Blind Beauty is thrilled to share with you snippets from Becky Andrews’ new book “Cultivating our Resilience Workbook/Journal.” Adversity strengthens and builds resilience; Becky will share weekly practices to help us become more resilient. ~Steph

Hello All

Thanks for following along in our cultivate resilience series. If you have just joined us, you might want to go back and review each practice. These practices have become a part of my routine. For me, they are all essential practices in the day. Some days call for more of one practice than another and that’s okay too.  

Practices 1 Through 8

Transformation

Recently, I shared these practices at a meeting and served lemonade. It was a beautiful morning and I reflected afterward that some of the challenges I had experienced in my life had led me to this moment and sharing with this group. The opportunity to share some lessons learned and meaningful moments was so sweet and is practice nine in our cultivating resilience path. 

A lemon is a great example of transformation. A lemon that may be sour just on its own can be transformed to lemonade, lemon meringue pie, or perhaps lemon bars through the process. This is resilience.

Today’s practice nine is to find the meaningful moments or lessons learned throughout our journey.  

The notion. I can gain wisdom and ultimately prevail. 

~Victor Frankl

Amidst the challenges that you may be experiencing, we find ourselves having meaningful moments and lessons learned. When we are open to noticing these they can teach us. Take a pause and ask yourself:

  • What lesson have I learned in this journey or challenge I am experiencing?  
  • What meaningful moments have I experienced?  
  • What have you learned about yourself during this time?  

Take your time. Remember to simply be curious. Be open to noticing what comes up for you. There isn’t a right or wrong answer. By asking ourselves these questions, we begin to invite the exploration.  

When we are no longer able to change a situation – we are challenged to change ourselves. 

~Victor E. Frankl 

It is my belief that we must honor the process of not being able to change a situation. There can be real grief, loss, trauma, disappointment that comes with this awareness and situation that has happened. Allow the time you need to recognize that you are not able to change a situation. Then, we are invited/challenged to change ourselves. To begin to find meaningful moments and the lessons learned at this time.  This practice can happen in moments. During a difficult day, you can also experience a meaningful moment or recognize a lesson learned.  This is resilience – that duality of us navigating a loss and finding a meaningful moment. It is navigating that challenge and also finding something that brings us joy and laughter. We can honor all aspects of ourselves.  

When we learn how to become resilient, we learn how to embrace the beautifully broad spectrum of the human experience.

~Jaeda Dewalt

We begin to thrive in our journey as we give ourselves permission to feel it all.  As Maya Angelou said:  My mission in life is not merely to survive, but to thrive and to do so with some passion, some compassion, some humor and some style. 

My mission in life is not merely to survive, but to thrive and to do so with some passion, some compassion, some humor and some style. 

~Maya Angelou

Thriving With Vision Loss

In my book, Look up, move forward; I share the story of presenting at a conference. In 1998 the Visions conference was in Chicago and I was asked to present a breakout session called “Coping with Vision Loss.” I was thrilled about the opportunity, both professionally and personally. Along the way, I had discovered so many practical tools that had helped me cope and I’d seen so many patients at the Moran with their own unique experiences and tools. I looked forward to sharing all of that at the conference. 

Pantera, my guide dog, was by my side. As I began my presentation, I was filled with gratitude for my journey from uncertain attendee to confidence presenter. Just a minute or two after I started a woman in the back spoke up. She was probably in her seventies and she said, “I have macular degeneration. I don’t want to just cope and get by.” I wasn’t sure where she was taking our conversation or what I was going to say next. “I want to thrive!” She finished with a flourish of her hand. Everyone in the room smiled and nodded. It’s what we all wanted, what we all want still. “Yes,” I agreed. “Thank you!” I shifted my message for the rest of the presentation substituting ‘thrive’ every time I’d planned to use ‘cope.” I’ve reflected on this powerful message and our desire to thrive. Resilience comes as we are able to shift from coping to thriving.  

We can cope with our life’s challenges or we can thrive with them. I realized her message was universal. We can cope with even the most difficult aspects of life, whatever they may be, or we can use our creativity to thrive. I’ll be forever grateful to this message. It changed the tone of my presentation and it changed my life. Look Up, Move Forward, page. 114-115.

Journaling

Thriving is growing. Take some time to journal about what thriving means to you. If you were thriving in your life with the challenges that you have, what would that look like? 

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Choose an area of your life where you feel you are coping – perhaps the reason why you have been reading this series.  How are you doing now?  Its okay if you are coping.  We need to give ourselves all the time and space to heal and to cope.  

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

As we give ourselves the time and space we need and utilize the practices we have talked about we will feel more of this practice nine of noticing the meaningful moments and lessons learned in our journey.  

I hope you will share your thoughts. I look forward to coming back next week for our final practice in cultivating resilience. And, if you’d like hope you can join us for three options for connection.

  1. Cultivating Resilience Virtual Course to begin Wednesdays, September 16th, 10 AM PT, 11 MT, 12 CT, 1 ET. Eight weeks – $30 full course.
  2. Daring to Own Your Story ™ Virtual Retreats for Women who are blind/low vision. Facilitated by Becky Andrews, LCMHC, and Sheila Koenig, MEd – both women who are blind. 6 weeks beginning September 15 1 PT, $125 full retreat
  3. Intensive four-day virtual retreat October 15-October 18, $125 full retreat

Contact Becky at becky.lpc@gmail.com for details!  

About The Author:

Image is described in the body of the post.
Becky Andrews

Becky Andrews is a Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor, Small Business Owner – Resilient Solutions, Inc, and founder of the Daring to Own Your Story ™ Retreats. She is also the author of Look up, move forward – her memoir of Losing her eyesight and finding her vision.  

You can follow her at:

Workbook: 

Cultivating our Resilience Workbook/Journal will be out Fall 2020. Email Becky at becky.lpc@gmail.com to be on the waiting list or preorder.

Image Descriptions:

  • Header: Photo of a pitcher of lemonade with two full mason glasses sitting on a wicker tray with several loose lemons strewn about. Text on the image says “Cultivating Resilience” and “Becky Andrews, LCMHC.”
  • Becky is sitting on outdoor steps next to her guide dog, Georgie, a gorgeous yellow lab.