Posted on Leave a comment

CoVid-19 TOTD #9: Staying Healthy

Image is described in the body of the post

HEALTH & WELLNESS

Editor’s Note:

At Bold Blind Beauty, our goal is for you to enjoy life, but be well while doing it. During #CoVid-19 we want to assist you with that, so here is our COVID-19 #TOTD (TipOf The Day).

Staying Healthy is a Priority!

By Cheryl Minnette

The #1 way not to become infected with the coronavirus is to stay away from everyone completely. Yes, that’s right, everyone! Now, unless you are the only person living on an uncharted island,  it is nearly impossible to not have any human contact at all. Since the reality for most people is that they are not on that island and will (most likely) come into contact with someone, at some time, on some level. When you do, will you know if they are contagious or not?

If they are not sick, what difference does it make?

Just like with many illnesses, someone having the coronavirus may appear to be perfectly healthy while living with this illness. The alarming point of this is they can potentially spread COVID-19 to others, which is known in some cases to lead to death. This is why the more someone interacts with others, they can increase their risk of becoming infected. With so many people moving about this earth being asymptomatic, it is critical that the guidelines that are  put in place for safety are adhered to.

Social distancing and no-contact are for protection not hindrance. Anyone could potentially be a carrier of the coronavirus and by not following proper protocols for safety, they could be spreading and infecting others without their knowledge or yours.

A person who is asymptomatic is someone who has an illness, but is not showing any symptoms of that illness,

A person who is asymptomatic is able to infect others because coronavirus is a contagion. This one reason alone is what makes it so difficult to find out who someone contracted the virus from. Knowing that the coronavirus is continually mutating and adapting to its human environment, following safety protocols is the best way to stay healthy in combat COVID-19.

Your thoughts are welcome, so comment below as to whether this TOTD was helpful, what you would like to know as it relates to safety tips, and what you were able to relate to. Your insights and expressions are appreciated. 

Image Description:

Photo of 4 young people with face masks on taking a group selfie of the Mona Lisa who also has on a face mask.

Posted on Leave a comment

CoVid-19 TOTD #8: Risk Factors

Image description is in the body of the post.

HEALTH & WELLNESS

Editor’s Note:

At Bold Blind Beauty, our goal is for you to enjoy life, but be well while doing it. During #CoVid-19 we want to assist you with that, so here is our  COVID-19 #TOTD (TipOf The Day).

CoVid-19 TOTD #8: Risk Factors

By Cheryl Minnette

Who is really at risk for COVID-19? 

This is a question that is being asked over and over again. As this pandemic continues, people want to be able to make informed decisions when it comes to the health and safety of themselves and their loved ones. As information is learned, the public wants to have that information shared with them, which is quite understandable. Being able to know the Center for Disease Control (CDC‘s) findings as to who is among those considered to be in the severe risk category would be helpful. It would afford us the opportunity to put the necessary precautions needed in place.

We have been told that if you have an underlying medical condition or if you are 65 or older you are in the severe risk category for COVID-19. Simply Being 65 or older is not what puts someone at risk. The reason this age category exists is because most people at that age and above have some type of underlying medical condition. Knowing this, what are some other areas we should be aware of? After the CDC reviewed data from multiple studies, these are the medical conditions that consistently showed up:

  • Chronic kidney disease
  • COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease)
  • Obesity (BMI of 30 or higher)
  • Immunocompromised state (weakened immune system) from solid organ transplant
  • Serious heart conditions, such as heart failure, coronary artery disease, or cardiomyopathies
  • Sickle cell disease
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Asthma
  • High blood pressure
  • Neurological conditions (dementia and cerebrovascular disease (stroke)

The CDC has been a great resource during this time of uncertainty. Did you know that over 40% of American adults are living with obesity? When you think of the number of people who have a combination of underlying illnesses which puts them at an even higher risk, that risk increases upwards towards 60%. The more informed you are, the more able you are to make decisions regarding your risk and the levels of risk that you choose to take. 

Businesses and communities have slowly been opening back up and with that comes more interaction and gathering of people. Knowing and understanding our role at this time can be crucial to us, our loved ones, and the community that surrounds us. Realize that every interaction we make, comes with some level of risk. 

Do not forget the safety measures that you already have in place. You should continue the handwashing, surface sanitizing, mask wearing, 6 feet or more of social distancing, and any other processes that will maintain your safety. Even if you’re not in one of the high risk categories as mentioned above, everyone is at risk because at any time you can come in contact with the coronavirus. Continue safety measures in order to protect yourself and those around you. As you are going out and engaging, be mindful to focus on activities that allow for social distancing of 6 feet or more. 

Your thoughts are welcome, so comment below as to whether this TOTD was helpful, what you would like to know as it relates to safety tips, and what you were able to relate to. Your insights and expressions are appreciated.

Image Description:

A silver caduceus symbol with a short staff entwined by two gold serpents, surrounded by silver wings.

Posted on Leave a comment

CoVid-19 TOTD #7: pH levels

Image is described in the body of the text

HEALTH & WELLNESS

Editor’s Note:

At Bold Blind Beauty, our goal is for you to enjoy life, but be well while doing it. During #CoVid-19 we want to assist you with that, so here is our  COVID-19 #TOTD (Tip Of The Day).

CoVid-19 TOTD #6: Being Conscious

By Cheryl Minnette

We, humans, are a smart species. As we try to figure things out in order to help ourselves, sometimes we aren’t seeing the whole picture. Since COVID-19 is so new, spreading like wildfire, and we are still learning about it, it makes sense that the fear of possible death has caused many to try all sorts of things. Some have even gone as far as drinking chemically manufactured cleaners. Others are attempting to go the PH route.

The pH value of COVID-19 is between 5.5 and 8.5 

With the ph level of COVID-19 being between 5.5 and 8.5, many think changing their diet is a cure. They think that eating an alkaline diet of food with a pH higher than 8.5 will automatically produce an environment that will eradicate the virus. What many don’t realize is that our bodies are engineered very intricately. When it comes to the pH levels, the human body is designed to regulate pH levels within a very narrow range. As humans, we cannot simply flip the alkaline switch to high to change our normal pH levels. 

Your thoughts are welcome, so comment below as to whether this TOTD was helpful, what you would like to know as it relates to safety tips, and what you were able to relate to. Your insights and expressions are appreciated. 

Image Description:

Two garlic bulbs sitting on a counter next to a small group of oranges.

Posted on 2 Comments

Cultivating Resilience Practice 10: Giving Back

Image is described in the body of the post.

HEALTH & WELLNESS

Editor’s Note:

Bold Blind Beauty is thrilled to share with you snippets from Becky Andrews’ new book “Cultivating our Resilience Workbook/Journal.” Adversity strengthens and builds resilience; Becky will share weekly practices to help us become more resilient. ~Steph

Hello All

We are at our final practice in Cultivating Resilience. I hope you have enjoyed this series and found them to be helpful. 

As I mentioned in the introduction, these are the practices that I find helpful in my own life and with my clients as we cultivate resilience. Cultivate is an action word. It means we are continuing to create, to dig down, to pause, to ask for what we need TO CULTIVATE our resilience. Resilience is that time of being stretched, pulled, and transformed as we navigate challenging times in our lives.  

Let’s review the last nine practices:

  • Practice one: Give yourself permission to feel. Honor your feelings and what you need.
  • Practice two: Take care of yourself and offer yourself much self-compassion for the journey.
  • Practice three: Utilize your strengths in the journey. Be authentically you as you navigate the challenging time.
  • Practice four: Reach out for support. Practice healthy boundaries and relationships.
  • Practice five: Resilience takes much grit and determination. Recognize and acknowledge your efforts.
  • Practice six: Find moments to savor, practice gratitude, and be mindful.
  • Practice seven: Find laughter and joy in each day.
  • Practice eight: Open to flexibility.  Perhaps there is another way.
  • Practice nine: Find the meaningful moments and lessons learned along the way.

Today’s Practice 10 Is Giving Back 

Lemonade image is described in the body of the post.
Lemonade

Helping Others. I think of it after we have found that lemonade, how are we going to serve the lemonade to others?  

In Victor Frankl’s book, Man’s Search for Meaning, he teaches that we can discover meaning in three ways: first by creating work or doing deeds to help others, second by experiencing something or encountering someone, and third, by the attitude, we take toward unavoidable suffering.  

Creating work or doing deeds to help others is indeed discovering meaning through our challenges. When we recognize that our difficult time may give us insight to help someone else, it can become empowering. It can become our why. It can become our way of sharing the lemonade that we have gained.  

Through this journey, we have been on what has resonated with you? How can you give back in a meaningful way to help others? Take a pause as much time as you need to ask yourself this question.  

Writing for Bold Blind Beauty gives me pause to think of the impact of Stephanae McCoy on the multiple ways she continues to give back and offer help to others from her challenging times. Such an example of resilience and doing just that.  

Becky and Georgie Image is described in the body of the post.
Hitting Their Stride

 I am not what happened to me. I am what I choose to become.

~Carl Jung

These practices are for you to explore. I honor your unique journey and what is helpful to you as you cultivate resilience. Be yourself. Do what feels best for you. Take it a step at a time in the direction that you want to go. Be kind and gentle to yourself on the journey. Recognize your grit and determination. It truly is awe-inspiring to see the human spirit. Recognize that perhaps, there is another way will help us in our resilience plan. Watch for those meaningful moments and lessons learned along the way. And then, offer lemonade to others.  You can make a difference to someone else’s life.  

If you’d like to join me in our next Cultivate Resilience course – email: resilientsolutionsinc@gmail.com. It will begin the week of September 14th. This is my opportunity to give back and the course is just $35 for 6 sessions. I would love to hear from you and what you have found most helpful about these practices. Also, my cultivate workbook is almost complete. I would love to hear from you on the way you find a workbook to be most accessible. 

About The Author:

Image is described in the body of the post.
Becky Andrews

Becky Andrews is a Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor, Small Business Owner – Resilient Solutions, Inc, and founder of the Daring to Own Your Story ™ Retreats. She is also the author of Look up, move forward – her memoir of Losing her eyesight and finding her vision.  

You can follow her at:

Workbook: 

Cultivating our Resilience Workbook/Journal will be out Fall 2020. Email Becky at becky.lpc@gmail.com to be on the waiting list or preorder.

Image Descriptions:

  • Header: Photo of Becky sitting on an indoor staircase next to her guide dog, Georgie, a gorgeous yellow lab.
  • Lemonade: Photo of a pitcher of lemonade with two full mason glasses sitting on a wicker tray with several loose lemons strewn about. Text on the image says “Cultivating Resilience” and “Becky Andrews, LCMHC.”
  • Hitting Their Stride: Becky appears so joyful as she and Georgie walk a dirt path in the open countryside.
  • Becky is sitting on outdoor steps next to her guide dog, Georgie, a gorgeous yellow lab.