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Ashley Nemeth | Blind Beauty Issue 26

Blind Beauty Issue 26 is described in the body of the post.

Ashley Nemeth | Blind Beauty Issue 26

“So how did I judge a beauty pageant, I judged it the same way I judge the world around me. I listened to what was going on, I listened to what they had to say. I listened to how confident they walked down the runway. And I was able to truly get to know them the real them and leave all the superficial things behind.” ~Ashley Nemeth

Ashley Nemeth has been featured on Bold Blind Beauty several times where I’ve shared some of her wisdom in the form of quotes. She is a fierce and tireless advocate who seizes life by knocking down barriers and spreading her message of equity like a champion fighter.

Blind Beauty Issue 26 Description:

Featured image is a Blind Beauty mock magazine cover. Ashley is all about business as her fashionably short-cropped blond hair frames her lovely face. In her selfie close-lipped smile, she has pink lip color and rosy cheeks. She is wearing a black blazer over a striking royal blue top. 

Blocks of text superimposed on Ashley’s photo are: “Bold | She Keeps Pressing Onward,” “Blind | She Has Deeper Insight,” “Beautiful | She Sees To The Heart Of Others.”

You can connect with Ashley on the following social media platforms (links below):

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Beauty Pageant Takes Step Towards Inclusion

Inclusion at a beauty pageant description is in the body of the post.

Beauty Pageant Takes Step Towards Inclusion

I live for the day when we will no longer need titles like those on today’s post as inclusion should be the norm. Until then, breaking down barriers requires awareness.

Ashley Nemeth, friend and featured Woman On The Move was recently asked to be a judge for a beauty pageant. I was thrilled when I saw the article about Ashley because she is an advocate working tirelessly to break down barriers. For the first time pageant, organizers of the Mrs. Canada Globe 2018 asked a blind person to be a judge.

In her own words, Ashley talks about her experience as Blind Judge for Beauty Pageant. Way to go Ashley!!

Featured Photo Description: 

Lined up on stage are ten women, five are wearing evening gowns, pageant sashes, and crowns. Two of the five are holding red paper-wrapped floral bouquets. Ashley and Rick (her guide dog) are fourth from the left standing next to the two women holding bouquets.

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WOTM 38 Featuring Ashley Nemeth

WOTM 38 Featured image description is in the body of the post.

WOTM 38 Featuring Ashley Nemeth

“I will not let my vision dictate what I can do in my life, and I certainly will not sit back and let life pass me by. I want to show the world what I am capable of despite my disability.” ~Ashley Nemeth

Confidence, strength, independent and loving life…

Close up photo of Ashley looking fabulous.

These are the traits that I had always wanted to have when I was younger. The problem was that I was not able to have these things when I was hiding the fact that I had vision loss. It is hard to be confident, strong and independent when you can not even admit to yourself that you can’t see the world around you, the way you should be able to.

There comes a point in your life when you just need to be happy and want to live your life to the fullest. For me, this came in the form of my worst nightmare. I lost the remaining sight that I had, very quickly. I was living in a sighted world and getting by as a sighted person even though the world was not clear through my eyes, but now that I had seen nothing except for light and dark there was no more hiding anything.

My world became dark and I really had to fight to get my life back. This was a hard journey, I had to really work to get to where I wanted to be. I am so happy in my life as it is right now, even in the dark. My life was turned upside down but it was the best thing that could have happened to me. I am now living the life I have always wanted.

Confident, strong, and independent…

I am able to live the life that I want because I took the time to work on me and make me a priority no matter what anyone else thought. Through that work I found that being an advocate was where I should be focusing my time, not trying to be sighted when we all know I never really passed because well…… I couldn’t damn well see haha! Acting is not my forte.

Now that I am able to live my life my way and love every minute I am able to help others to realize that, life as a blind person is not a death sentence. It does not mean that your life is over and will suck from that point on. The complete opposite, in fact, you can live a full amazing life…. you just have to want it.

Ashley’s been featured on Bold Blind Beauty several times where she’s shared some of her wisdom in the form of quotes. She is a fierce and tireless advocate who seizes life by knocking down barriers and spreading her message of equity like a champion fighter.

WOTM 38 Featured Image Description:

Ashley is standing with her snowboard in one hand and her guide dog Rick is standing next to her. She’s dressed for the snow wearing black snow pants, black knit hat, and a burgundy puff jacket.

You can connect with Ashley on the following social media platforms:

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Capable, Competent & Crushing It

“You’re not blind, you looked at me;” or “What do you mean you’re blind? Who put your make-up on this morning?” or “What do you mean you’re blind? You have kids.” ~Ashley Nemeth, www.blindmovingon.com

Close up photo of Ashley wearing her makeup.

Unlike the term “a little bit pregnant,” blindness is not like this. In blindness, there isn’t an “is” or “is not.” There is a wide range in the loss of eyesight (it’s not as simple as seeing or not seeing). For those of us who make the decision to get on with life after sight loss, we learn different methods of accomplishing the tasks we used to do. Anything is possible when we choose not to limit ourselves.

Blindness is not black or white. According to VisionAware.org, the estimated percentage of people who are “totally without sight” or no light perception is 15%—the remaining 85% of all individuals with eye disorders have some remaining sight.