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Don’t Look Back A Song

A Happy Start to Your Monday

In case you haven’t noticed I get a kick out of sharing the talents of people I admire. Lately it seems, and it really is a coincidence, the Women on the Move have literally been on the move with some amazing projects.

Today it’s my pleasure to share with you a song whose lyrics were written by Kerry Kijewski of the blog, Her Headache and composed/produced by her brother Brian Kijewski. This song will blow your socks off. Enjoy!

 

DON’T LOOK BACK

Performed by: Brian Kijewski (composer/producer), guitar, and bass, musical arrangement; Kerry Kijewski wrote lyrics; Andrew McIntyre on drums; Imogen Wasse on vocals; mastering done by Carl Peter Matthes

There are days I can’t let you go. Something lost to be found.
Wandering through fog, a forest for the trees.

I’m searching. Bright, shocking are the flashes. Something out there, this I know.

Back back back I see. Things still reminding me. At the back of my mind’s eye, there I spy.

There are days, I know how you look. Reach all around, a hand to help me up.
In that empty void, just out of reach, giving in, all so vast I don’t know why.

Back back back I see. Things still reminding me. At the back of my mind’s eye, there I spy.

Don’t look back. Don’t look back.
Don’t look back. Don’t look back.
Don’t look back. No don’t look back.
Don’t look back.

Back back back I see. Things still reminding me. At the back of my mind’s eye, there I spy.

MMM. MMM.
Ahhh.

On those days, I remember, Your details refuse to come back. All the while, I’m remembering.

Don’t look back. No don’t look back.
Don’t look back. No don’t look back.
Don’t look back. No, don’t look back. Don’t look back.

Back back back I see. Things still reminding me. At the back of my mind’s eye, there I spy.

(Fade out and repeat)
Don’t look back. Don’t look back.
Don’t look back. Don’t look back.
Don’t look back. Don’t look back.

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A Lil’ Inspiration #9 Joy

Confidence Born of Self Acceptance

Happy Friday All!!

Image description is located within the post
Quote by Joy Evans | Double Vision Blog

To start the weekend on a positive note the following quote is a snippet from “The Middle of Our Stories” an insightful post written by Joy Thomas on the process of arriving at confidence. I think it’s important for all of us to remember that achieving confidence is an ongoing process as we all struggle with insecurities. Some days we feel less confident than others, however it’s out of those moments of insecurity that we learn how to become more confident.

“She’s standing on the corner, cane in hand, waiting to cross, and she looks like she knows where she’s going. She’s approachable and aware. She accepts people the way she has accepted herself, fully. There is a lightness in her footsteps because she doesn’t take herself too seriously. She sees life as an adventure and not an emergency.” ~Joy Thomas, Freelance Writer www.doublevisionblog.com

Image: Quoted text is teal against a background of a sunrise and the silhouette of a woman with the palm of her hand outstretched. The way the photo was taken it appears as if the woman is holding the sun in the palm of her hand.

Have a great weekend everyone!!

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Abigale The Poem

Abigail by Jazmin Ruiz

Poem & Image described in blog post
Jazmin Ruiz | A Poet’s Lines

This poem by a good friend of mine, and another “Woman on the Move,” Jazmin Ruiz of the blog A Poet’s Lines really touched my heart because she very eloquently captures what Abigail represents.

Image: poem is in white text against a transparent black column overlaid on a background of fashionable women silhouettes walking in one direction and Abigail facing the women walking in the opposite direction.

Abigail

As she steps forth to face the crowds
Some will stare, some will pass.
Captures attention as she goes
What do they really know?

She walks on by, her head held high
Opinions form in minds.
Some only see the stick she holds
What do they really know?

With cane in hand she proves she’s strong.
Breaking through opinions
She’s changing minds, she’s changing views
Shows them what they should know.

Strength and beauty is what she holds.
Walking tall, head held high.
And there she goes achieving goals
That’s all they need to know.

#abbyonthemove

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Tosha Michelle

Eyes That See Beyond The Tangible

Headshot of Tosha
Tosha Michelle

It warms my heart each time I meet and befriend a new “Woman on the Move” because we share the some of the same philosophies on disabilities and especially those involving sight loss. Today I am honored to present to you the brilliantly talented Tosha Michelle of the blog, Everything I Never Told You. Tosha is a published author, poetess, singer and advocate. She is also one of the most grounded people you will ever meet.

Hello everyone. My thanks to Stephanie for inviting me to do this guest post.

My vision issues began at birth. I was born premature and this  caused damage to my optic nerve. I’m on the cusp of being legally blind without my glasses, with my glasses, my vision is 20’/80. As a child, I never really understood that my vision was poor. After all, it was the only vision I had known. Throughout my formative years and even into highschool. I had a lovely visual aid teacher who worked with me to insure I had the tools I needed to succeed in school and succeed I did.

I am unable to drive a car. This was a source of great sadness to me as a teenager. Who doesn’t want the freedom that comes with a set of wheels?:) Over the years, I’ve learned to accommodate by walking when I can and by the support of my family and friends.

Headshot of Tosha
Tosha Michelle

Being visually impaired hasn’t stopped me from getting a college education, working, and having a family. I can do anything a sighted person can do, it just might take me a little longer. I’m really blessed with the sight I do have. I can’t tell you how inspiring women like Stephanie are to me. As I mentioned,  I’ve never been able to see well. I don’t know what I’m missing. When I read Stephanie story, I was so impressed with her tenacity and spirit. I can’t imagine going from being a slighted person to losing your vision. However, Stephanie knows as I do, that being visually impaired is not a death sentence. It’s simply a matter of adjusting to a new way of being. It’s seeing the world through new eyes, eyes that are every bit as beautiful as before but eyes that know adversity, eyes that see beyond the tangible and find light in humanity, compassion and self-worth.

To learn more about Tosha you can connect with her on the following social media platforms: