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How Do I Tie Thee? Let Me Count The Ways

6 Ways To Tie The Oblong Scarf

Hinge Patchwork Print Scarf. Bold patterns intensify the graphic appeal of a gauzy, fringe-trimmed scarf. 28 inches wide by 76 inches long. 100 percent wool. Colors are shades of teal and white.
Hinge Patchwork Print Scarf Nordstrom

I think I was in my mid to late 20’s when I wore my first oblong scarf. I bought it to go along with this navy lightweight knit sleeveless dress and matching sweater outfit. The scarf had several shades of blue including a navy identical to my outfit. I fell in love.

While I no longer have that first scarf I have since collected a number of scarves in different colors, shapes, textures and some even have embellishments.

Infinity scarves, like the name implies, have no end. These endless loop scarves, like their predecessors, come in differing lengths, colors, fabrics, and textures.

I really like warm cozy scarves however with the onset of ‘private summers’ I’d have to rip them off. I salute women who can wear them in the summer because I’d probably burst into flames.

How Do You Tie Or Wear An Oblong Scarf?

Scarves are an excellent accessory that can be worn with or in place of necklaces. And you can’t beat the versatility. I’m going to give you 6 ideas on how to wear/tie these beauties:

  1. Women's Fringed Infinity Scarf loose knit 100 percent acrylic with fringes. Coral colored. www.lifeisgood.com
    Women’s Fringed Infinity Scarf
    www.lifeisgood.com

    Drape the scarf around your neck and allow it to hang loose without tying.

  2. Drape scarf around your neck, take one end, cross over your body to flip the end over your shoulder, and allow it to hang loose without tying. You can also add a pretty brooch where the scarf overlaps.
  3. Drape the scarf around your neck and tie the ends in a loose single knot and allow it to hang loose.
  4. Hold the scarf lengthwise in front of you, bring it to your neck. Drape it over your shoulders so the ends drape down your back. This looks especially nice with a dress or a dressy pants suit.
  5. Hold the scarf lengthwise in front of you, bring it to your neck. Drape it over your shoulders then take each end and cross them in the back. Bring the ends to the front. You can leave the loop on your neck or pull it for slack to let it hang a little loose.
  6. Fold the scarf lengthwise, drape around your neck, take the loose ends and place them in the loop. You can leave the loop loose or pull the loose ends to bring it closer to your neck. If I have a long enough scarf I like to take one of the loose ends and fling it over one or both shoulders.

There are many ways to wear scarves and over the course of the next couple of weeks, I will share some interesting ways to use them that you might not have considered.

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WOTM 7 Featuring Karen Rowie

“Friendship is unnecessary, like philosophy, like art… It has no survival value; rather it is one of those things that give value to survival.” ~C. S. Lewis

Today I felt moved to talk about a friend of mine who probably doesn’t even know how she’s affected my life. When I think of the paradox of how fearful I was of blindness, then enduring my vision loss, I sometimes wonder if becoming friends with a blind girl somehow prepared me for what was yet to come.

My very first personal foray into the world of blindness was when I introduced myself to Karen Rowie. Karen was a couple of years younger than I and I remember when the neighborhood kids would be playing outside Karen would sit alone on her porch.

I would love to be able to say that it was on my initiative that I met Karen when in fact my mother instructed me to do so. My mother and I always had somewhat of a strained relationship but this one simple act of kindness, she demanded I do, would change my life in such a way that even today I still feel the impact.

It was with trepidation that I approached the steps to Karen’s porch and I was seething with anger that my mother was making me do something that felt so uncomfortable. Fear of saying or doing the wrong thing enveloped me like a cloak because the only prior exposure I had to blindness was what I learned in school about Helen Keller.

“When we honestly ask ourselves which person in our lives means the most to us, we often find that it is those who, instead of giving advice, solutions, or cures, have chosen rather to share our pain and touch our wounds with a warm and tender hand.” Henri Nouwen

One of the things I didn’t understand about Karen, and until recently didn’t know there was even a word for it, was that she exhibited blindisms. Blindisms are behaviors sometimes found in blind children such as body rocking, head swaying and eye rubbing. I don’t know why Karen moved like she did and after I got to know her it really didn’t matter.

After I got over my initial awkwardness of meeting Karen, I enjoyed hanging out with her. We would go to the movies (I would narrate), take the bus into the city (Pittsburgh) and go to what is now called the Western Pennsylvania School for Blind Children.

Karen’s parents were very protective of her and because of this she was not allowed to leave the porch. So I would sit with her while she would read to me one of her Braille books or I would do likewise with a printed version. At times some of the other neighborhood kids would come by as well and Karen would get so excited to have attention lavished upon her.

“One of the most beautiful qualities of true friendship is to understand and to be understood.” Lucius Annaeus Seneca

Karen was such a sweet person and I may not have known it then but I realize that having her come into my life was a defining moment. What I learned from my friendship with her was that she was like any other kid who wanted to laugh, play, go to the movies and be accepted by her peers. I also learned that Karen’s blindness was only one of many characteristics which added to her uniqueness.

It’s been many years since I’ve last seen Karen and wherever you are I just want to thank you for being my friend. If by chance you see this post please contact me by email at boldblindbeauty@gmail.com.

Thank you

Steph

“Walking with a friend in the dark is better than walking alone in the light.” ~Helen Keller

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Eyebrow Solutions

If eyes are the windows to the soul then the eyebrows are the frames

e.l.f. Eyebrow Stencil Kit
e.l.f. Eyebrow Stencil Kit

I am so excited!! Over the weekend I received in the mail 2 tools that I mentioned last Monday to help with applying my eye makeup. Both items come from e.l.f. www.eyeslipsface.com and I can’t wait to share my feedback.

The first tool is the Eyebrow Stencil Kit and my immediate observation right out of the box was the great flexibility of the stencils. No stranger to eyebrow stencils, in the past I’ve tried a couple of different types and they were either too rigid or the shapes weren’t even close to my natural brows.

The e.l.f. eyebrow stencils come in 4 different shapes:

  1. Soft arch – is a gently rounded shape that follows the line of the eyelids. Soft arch eyebrows are perfect for women who have sharp, angular features, as they enhance softness to the overall look.
  2. Structured arch – is noted for a sharp slant upward from the inner corner of the eye, and a downward slant toward the outer edge. Women who have rounder or wider facial features can benefit from the vertical line created for a slimming look with this style.
  3. Curved arch – is a mixture of the structured and curved arches and is characterized by an upward slant from the inner corner of the eye to almost two-thirds distance, and finishing with a slight bend downward along the outside.
  4. Full arch – is depicted by minimal curvature along the length of the brow, and is good for women who have very narrow faces, or widely spaced eyes.

“Knowing your face shape is the first step to creating your most beautiful look” ~Kevyn Aucoin

The very first step in determining the shape of your eyebrows is, knowing the shape of your face. There are 4 basic facial shapes and I’ve provided the arch that works best with each shape:

  • foraywhileOval – forehead is wider than the chin with prominent cheekbones, face tapers to a narrow oval chin (soft arch)
  • Round – face is almost as wide as it is long, face is widest at the cheeks (structure arch)
  • Square/long – forehead, cheekbones and jaw line are all about the same widths with the squared jaw line being the most obvious feature (soft arch or full arch)
  • Heart – similar to oval but the chin tapers to a point (curved arch)

How to apply eyebrow makeup

  • Run your finger along your eyebrow to get an idea of the natural brow line
  • Place your index finger straight alongside your nose to the top of your brow line. (This is the start of your eyebrow).
  • Place your index finger alongside your nose and angle it outwards to the outer corner of your eye. (This is where the eyebrow ends).
  • Once you have determined which stencil to use, line up the widest end of the stencil to the beginning of the brow line
  • Likewise with the end of the brow line the thinnest end will be at the outer corner of the eye
  • Once you are satisfied with the placement of the stencil you can use eyebrow makeup to softly fill in area.
  • After you have applied the eyebrow makeup you’ll want to use an eyebrow brush to gently groom the brows and blend the makeup color for a more natural appearance.
  • Practice, practice, practice.

If you are using eyebrow stencils for the first time it is going to take some time to get used to them and you may have to try several different types before finding ones that work for you. I really like the ones I received because I found them easy to use and my brows looked awesome (this compliment from my son who notices little).

The second eye makeup tool I received was the Mascara Guide from e.l.f. I will explain how to use this guide next week but I can tell you that I think it’s a great tool especially for my upper lashes.

e.l.f. Mascara & Shadow Shield
e.l.f. Mascara & Shadow Shield

Overall for a cost of around $6.00 I definitely feel these two tools are worth the money. I’m still waiting on a couple of other items and once they come I’ll let you know my thoughts.

Ciao

“I just like playing with makeup and clothes – so I really don’t feel like there are rules, and if there are rules, then I think it’s up to you to break them.” ~Kesha

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WOTM 6 Featuring Libby Thaw

WOTM Featuring Libby Thaw

Libby The Visionary

Collage of Libby Thaw (one picture of Libby performing at the microphone and two headshots of her)
Libby Thaw

In December, 2009 it had been 6 months since I was declared legally blind and it felt as if everything in my life was spiraling out of control. Since my vision loss is a hidden disability this was one of the most challenging aspects of the ordeal. It was right around this time that I met Libby Thaw who offered me a lifeline.

The feeling of isolation one can experience when they lose their vision can leave you with a paralyzing fear that you can never make it out of the dark abyss. Because I knew I wasn’t emotionally ready to use the white cane Libby’s Checkered Eye Project (CEP), an international low vision awareness effort, was the perfect solution for me.

“Everybody, including people with disabilities, makes assumptions. Problems arise when we are not open to learning our assumption was wrong.” ~Libby

Libby Thaw, a wife and stay at home mother who resides in Port Elgin, Ontario Canada founded the CEP in 2000. I remember during one of our many conversations Libby told me the CEP idea evolved out of a chat with a couple of like-minded individuals. The concept was simple and revolved around a discreet hands-free option for people with low vision to self-identify to let others know of their disability.

Libby, who also happens to be legally blind, understands the difficulties one encounters with loss of vision. On one hand, people with low-vision can be challenged with day-to-day tasks yet on the other hand, to the general public, their disability is not apparent. It’s because of this hidden disability that Libby designed an emblem representative of, and for those impacted with, significant vision loss.

The CE is a pin, patch, or button, which may be worn to subtly indicate its wearer has partial blindness, also known as low vision. In addition, the CE creates a unique opportunity for open dialogue to build awareness on low vision and what the symbol represents.

Personally, I can attest to the sense of empowerment I gained when using the CE. Since I had no control over the loss of my vision at least I could control who I chose to make aware of my situation. And even though I do need to use the white cane now I still wear my pin to increase its visibility.

Libby who has Stargardt disease, the most common form of inherited juvenile macular degeneration, is a motivational speaker, writer, and entertainer (you really should hear her sing). I had the chance to host Libby as my guest when she came to Pittsburgh to attend the Foundation Fighting Blindness’ Pittsburgh VisionWalk back in 2011.

Music gives me a great feeling of oneness. I like to take in the sense that we are all in it together; the musicians are obviously in on the cooperation, but the crowd has lots to do with it too. I’m so glad my eyesight doesn’t hinder that. In fact it probably augments it. Since I can’t see people’s facial expressions I project my own ideas of what their movements and body language are saying. ~Libby

Upon meeting her at the airport I was immediately struck by Libby’s energy and enthusiasm. The weekend was a flurry of activities that included a stop at Pittsburgh Blind and Vision Rehabilitation Services for a tour of the low vision facility and an opportunity for Libby to talk about the CEP.

To each eating establishment we went during Libby’s 2-day stay she would ask the host/hostess if they had large print menus and this opened the door for further discussion about the CEP. It was refreshing to see someone actively self-advocating while at the same time bringing attention to an issue impacting many people across the U.S. and worldwide.

In October of 2013, Libby was invited by the California Council of the Blind (CCB) in San Diego, California to attend their annual state convention. Not one to pass up an opportunity to spread the word on the CEP Libby packed her bags and traveled to the CCB’s convention. She wrote a very insightful blog on the trip which you can peruse at your leisure by clicking HERE.

I would be remiss if I didn’t mention that the CE is not a mobility or safety device, rather it is a tool for face-to-face interaction only and its use is a matter of personal choice which gives the wearer the option of determining with whom to share their vision loss. If you or someone you know would be interested in learning more about the CEP Libby can be contacted directly by email at info@checkeredeye.com or you can visit her website at www.checkeredeye.com.

If you have any questions or would like additional information from me please leave a comment below or email me at smccoy@boldblindbeauty.com.

I think the following quote accurately sums up today’s bold blind beauty. Libby, I want to thank you for being you and in so doing being a positive role model and a ray of hope for people impacted by vision loss.

“We should be taught not to wait for inspiration to start a thing. Action always generates inspiration. Inspiration seldom generates action.” ~Frank Tibolt