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Acceptance Of Sight Loss | Abby’s Reflections 26

Acceptance #26: After the trauma, and accompanying period of adjustment to losing my sight, it seemed like there was a built-in coping mechanism where my brain forgot previous vision. It became a mixed blessing that allowed me to continue moving onward with my life. Complete image description is in the body of the post.

Acceptance Of Sight Loss | Abby’s Reflections 26

“After the trauma, and accompanying period of adjustment to losing my sight, it seemed like there was a built-in coping mechanism where my brain forgot previous vision. It became a mixed blessing that allowed me to continue moving on with my life.”

Acceptance of any loss in our lives is a process. Losing eyesight and how you respond to it is different for everyone. For me and my friends, our lives have not only gone on after sight loss but we are living abundantly.

While the process of losing eyesight is not easy, it boils down to choosing how you want to live. By placing more focus on what you have instead of what you’ve lost you can handle most anything.

Many of us come to appreciate our sight loss as an opportunity to become a beacon of hope to those new to the experience. As we continually adjust to living without sight we gain new skills while leaning on our other senses.

Another huge piece to the puzzle is for people to remember we are not our eyesight or lack thereof. The word “blind” has no special power over us and we are not subhuman. Our eyes simply do not function.

Abby’s Reflections Description: 

A gray, teal, and white boldblindbeauty.com template utilizing the ‘Abby’s Corner’ image of Abby sitting cross-legged in her PJs (gray bottoms & white top with a gray collar) with a teal Abby logo laptop on her lap. Sporting her signature explosive hairstyle, she is wearing a headset with microphone and her white cane is propped up next to her.

7 thoughts on “Acceptance Of Sight Loss | Abby’s Reflections 26

  1. Fantastic post!
    XxX

  2. Until we are faced with certain challenges we don’t know how much courage we’ve got and how strong we truly are. Like you said, acceptance is a process that goes differently for everyone, but once we’ve reached that level of understanding and acceptance, resilience steps in and we rise above our situation. I enjoyed this reflection.

    1. Amen Jackie, very well said. I think our fears play into some of these situations as well and for some it can be paralyzing. But when we get to the point of acceptance the fear release its hold on us.

  3. Living abundantly is not only possible for blind persons, I feel it is almost a better way to live in that I feel we perceive the world in a deeper, richer, and more profound and meaningful way as sightless persons. Life for me is comprised of daily adventures of discovering the world in a whole new and different way, using the blend of the rich fabric of sound, the touch and feel of a human hand or hug, the aromas of a café, and the enjoyment of a wonderful tasty meal. It is an opportunity to show the sighted world that we are a beacon of hope as we communicate to everyone around us that we are a diverse bunch of whole people who do most everything a sighted person does, and often more, people who have gained new skills in using our other senses to experience the wonderful world we live in. Thanks for sharing this insightful post Ms. Abigale!

    1. Oh Carla, this is so well said. You know I’m gonna have to borrow some of this deep insight.

  4. Hello, beautiful Lady, you are so uplifting and encouraging. Thanks.

    1. Hello Oneta, thank you for your kind words. <3

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