Tell A Friend Tuesday!

Lost In Two Worlds

Blindness Symbols: For traffic safety - the white cane; For low vision recognition - the Checkered EyeMy friend and fellow “Woman on the Move,” Libby Thaw of The Checkered Eye Project, began a Facebook campaign earlier this year to increase awareness on low vision. I’ve featured Libby several times on Bold Blind Beauty and today I thought I’d share the ‘Tellafriend Tuesday,’ campaign here.

One of the joys I receive from this blog is the sense of community among our members. In addition to sharing style tips with women who are blind or sight impaired, I wanted to create a space where we can talk openly about blindness/sight loss to bring together sighted and non-sighted communities to share our experiences and learn from one another.

On a number of occasions we’ve talked about the vast range of sight loss, how blind people appear, and the dichotomy of living in the sighted and non-sighted world. For many people with low vision one of our major pain points is not being fully sighted yet not being fully blind. Case in point, check out the photos in this post of a few of my lovely friends who, if you were not aware, have sight loss.

Terri Rupp
Terri Rupp
Joy & Jenelle
Joy & Jenelle

Adapting to losing a major sense like eyesight is extremely difficult physically and compounded emotionally by the frustration of a hidden disability that others do not, or cannot understand. Think of it this way: if someone who appears healthy is diagnosed with cancer no one would say to that person “you don’t look like you have cancer.” The same holds true for people with low vision who may or may not require mobility aids.

Holly & baby Aoife Bonner
Holly & Aoife Bonner
Suzanne Gibson
Suzanne Gibson

Looking or not looking blind does not alter the fact that a person with significant sight loss may function well due to adaptability to their environment. What this means in part is once we’ve gotten the lay of the land we may not need to rely on our mobility devices if we use such devices to navigate. However if an unannounced change should occur within that environment it could cause a serious mishap.

Kimberly White
Kimberly White
Amy Bovaird Book signing
Amy Bovaird

Libby created the Checkered Eye to aid people with sight loss self identify their disability in face-to-face interactions and to help sighted people recognize that when a person is wearing the symbol it means that individual has sight loss. The black and white checkered eye—an image of a simple eye the center of which, the iris, is black and white checkers bears the text “LOW VISION”—is a wearable symbol to indicate its user has a sight impairment.

Jill Khoury Poet
Jill Khoury
Libby Thaw
Libby Thaw

What Can You Do To Help?

Since Tellafriend Tuesday is movement to increase understanding on sight loss Libby is asking us to share the message on social media.

You can help Libby tell the whole world there’s a “blindness spectrum” by sharing this blog post or downloading and sharing the “Blindness Symbols” image in this post.

Not everyone who looks sighted is fully sighted. Not everyone with a guide dog or white cane is fully blind. A bit of understanding can go a long way in the lives of people who are already managing some real difficulties.

Please share on your Facebook timeline, Twitter and/or Instagram and see if you can get a friend to share too! THANKS!

Author: Steph McCoy

Hi I'm Steph, a businesswoman, style setter, blogger, and abilities crusader who breaks the myth that “blind people can’t be fashionable.” “It’s about walking boldly with confidence, transcending barriers and changing the way we perceive blindness”

14 thoughts on “Tell A Friend Tuesday!”

  1. Not knowing thoday was Tell a friend Tuesdayd day about blindness and low vision; I was telling my friend Chris about RP afger he told his Mom was diagnosed with Mac Degen. She was upset and only has it in 1 eye. I talked to Chris and he felt like he gained more knowledge about the RP and Mac Degen. I suggested that his Mom go through with the eye shot. She’s doesn’t like the idea of a needle in her eye.

    Sherri Rodgers

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Sherri, This particular Tellafriend Tuesday is not an official blindness/low vision day, at least not yet, rather it’s a campaign developed by Libby. I hope Chris’ mom decides to go through with the shots because they aren’t bad at all (it sounds worse than it is). When I had my shot of Avastin I thought it was going to be like the time my doctor injected the gas bubble but it wasn’t even close.

      Like

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