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A Shot in the Dark

Shooting Down Assumptions

Acrylic Makeup Cosmetics Organizer Luxury Crystal Insert Holder Box www.amazon.com
Acrylic Makeup Cosmetics Organizer Luxury Crystal Insert Holder Box
Amazon

Long before I lost my eyesight my middle son, Devon, was diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). To the casual onlooker, if Devon was having a good day, he would not appear to have anything wrong with him. If that same casual onlooker had the opportunity to spend some time with Devon they would soon need nerve medication.

Devon’s ADHD was a hidden disability that began long before his diagnosis at 6 years of age. From head banging as a baby, behavioral problems at 4 daycare facilities to never finishing kindergarten because he was expelled, to say he was a challenge is putting it mildly. I remember one of his daycare teachers telling me she just didn’t understand it because he was such an adorable, loving child. Every morning he would come and give hugs and kisses to his teachers and then later in the day something inside him would snap.

Upon the ADHD diagnosis the doctor told me that the mechanism in Devon’s brain that should keep him from acting compulsively was broken. This was why he acted out and just kept me on the edge of my seat. Life with little Devon was never boring and his disability was my introduction to the special education system and advocacy efforts on his behalf.

Devon is completely fine today and is a graduate of Indiana University of Pennsylvania. He majored in psychology and minored in music and is looking to start his own business.

Having experienced inaccurate assumptions first-hand, I remind myself things aren’t always as they might appear. The other piece that bears mentioning is the struggle for people who have hidden disabilities is multilayered. While some of us may choose to keep our disability under wraps there are others who want to be taken at face value without judgment.

Take cosmetics for example, wouldn’t you think it would be rather odd for someone to say to a person wearing makeup “You don’t really look like that…?” Likewise, when someone has a hidden disability and they self-identify, we should be mindful to do so takes courage and filter out our assumptions.

Makeup can be such a wonderful ego boost and it is so much fun to experiment with different types of cosmetics. For us blind and vision impaired ladies though it can be a bit of a challenge it’s definitely doable especially if we’re organized.

Visual clutter is a term I heard recently and it something that can be very distracting for people with low vision. Minimalistic is word that I’ve always liked for its simplicity.

How do we get rid of visual clutter with cosmetics? Paring down to just the essentials is really only the beginning. Organizing and labeling your makeup will help you in being able to readily locate any of your cosmetics. Investing in an organizer that works for you is worthwhile.

The 2-piece acrylic holder that I got from Amazon works best for me because it’s see-through and I like that I can put everything in one place. Also, it’s the perfect size that lends to ease in keeping it neat and tidy.

There are a total of 4 drawers (2 side by side at the top and 2 longer ones directly underneath). The inset piece that I sit on top of the drawers can actually be used as a stand alone. The unit measures 9.4 inches wide by 5.1 inches deep by 7.5 inches tall.

Since I know exactly where each of my cosmetics and tools are I don’t feel the need to label the drawers on the organizer but if I change my mind at a later date I can do so at that time.

“Whether I’m wearing lots of makeup or no makeup, I’m always the same person inside.” ~Lady Gaga

10 thoughts on “A Shot in the Dark

    1. Thank you for the reblog, I appreciate it!❤

  1. Bouquets to you for successfully raising Devon … despite his being diagnosed with ADHD. You (and he) can be proud of his achievements!
    You amaze me Steph … you have overcome so much in your life and you continue to do so with an admirable attitude. I applaud you!

  2. Your posts are so inspiring and informational, I always learn something new.

    1. Awe thanks Khaya. Sometimes when I go back and re-read them for possible re-posting I cringe so hearing this from you makes me feel so good. Thank you

  3. Love how you relate these two concepts in this post. It’s important, no matter what we do to cover up, that we always take the time to remember what there is to be found underneath.

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